Chamomile Oil











roman chamomile



Chamomile Oil....The plant is a strongly scented, bitter herb whose aromatic flowers and leaves are used in medicine and in making tea.





Chamomile Differences



Blue Chamomile

Has a high content of Azulene, the active organic compound of Chamomile, which bears a blue color. Azulene has anti-inflammatory, skin healing properties. This oil is most suitable as an ingredient for skin care products. Blue Chamomile is derived from the German Chamomile plant, which is an upright growing annual. There are German Chamomile plants that were breed for a high Azulene content to use in the manufacturing of medicinal Chamomile products.

Roman Chamomile

Is used for its skin healing properties in the manufacturing of body care products, as well as for Aromatherapy. It has a very pleasant, soothing, apple-like aroma. The Roman Chamomile plant is a low growing, perennial ground cover.

Moroccan Chamomile

Isn't from a true Chamomile plant. It is used mainly in perfume blends, and for aromatherapy. The plant is an annual that grows in the Mediterranean and in the Middle East. This is a product new to the market, it does not have a long history of traditional uses like true Chamomile.

Wild Chamomile Around Log Fence, Colorado, USA
Wild Chamomile Around Log Fence, Colorado, USA

Photographic Print
Jones, Adam
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Blue Chamomile



Botanical Name – Matricaria recutita (Matricaria chamonilla)

Common Method of Extraction – Steam distilled

Parts Used – Flowers

Note Classification - Middle

Aroma – Strong, warm, sweet herbaceous

Largest Producing Countries – England, Eastern Europe, Spain, and Hungary

Traditional Use - Used in French liqueurs and for flavoring tobacco. And medicinally it has been used for nervous related ailments.

Properties - Analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antiphlogistic, antispasmodic, bactericidal, carminative, cicatrizant, digestive, emmenagogue, febrifuge, fungicidal, hepatic, nerve sedative, stomachic, sudorific, vermifuge, vulnerary.

Benefits - Acne, arthritis, asthma, broken capillaries, burns, colic, cuts, dermatitis, dysmenorrhea, dyspepsia, eczema, headache, indigestion, insect bites, insomnia, menstrual disorders, migraine, muscular pain, muscular spasms, nausea, nervous tension, neuralgia, rashes, rheumatism, sensitive skin, sprains, stress related complaints, wounds. When adding blue chamomile to skin preparations take the color of the oil into consideration.

Blends Well With -Benzoin, bergamot, citrus oils, clary sage, frankincense, geranium, jasmine, labdanum, lavender, marjoram, neroli, patchouli, rose, rosemary, tea tree, ylang ylang.

Of Interest - Blue chamomile oil has a higher azulene content then Roman chamomile oil. This constituent also gives the oil its characteristic blue color. The azulene isn't present in the fresh flower but is produced during the process of distillation. The name Matricaria comes from the Latin matrix, meaning “womb”, because of its widespread use by women for gynecological conditions.

Safety Data - Non-toxic, non-irritant; caused dermatitis in some individuals. Not to be used while pregnant

Roman Chamomile



Botanical Name - Arthemis nobilis or Chamaemelum nobile

Common Method Of Extraction - Steam distilled

Parts Used – Flowers

Note Classification - Middle

Aroma - Fresh, rich, sweet, fruity, apple-like aroma

Largest Producing Countries - USA, Britain, Belgium, Hungary, Italy, and France

Traditional Use - Chamomile has been used as a strewing herb. The oil is used in perfumery and has a high ester content which makes this oil a valuable antispasmodic. Widely used in cosmetics, detergents, perfumes and hair and bath products.

Properties - Analgesic, antibacterial, antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antineuralgic, antiphlogistic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, carminative, cholagogue, digestive, emmenagogue, febrifuge, hepatic, nerve sedative, stomachic, sudorific, tonic, vermifuge, vulnerary.

Benefits - Acne, arthritis, boils, burns, chilblains, colic, cuts, dermatitis, dysmenorrhea, earache, eczema, fevers, hair care, headache, indigestion, inflammations, insect bites, insomnia, menopause, migraine, muscular pain, nausea, nervous tension, neuralgia, rheumatism, sprains, stress related complaints, teething pain, toothache, wounds. Chamomile may give a blend for muscle pain a warm fruity note.

Blends Well With - Bergamot, clary sage, eucalyptus, geranium, grapefruit, jasmine, labdanum, lavender, lemon, neroli, oakmoss, palmarosa, rose otto, and tea tree.

Of Interest - In ancient Egypt chamomile was used as an offering to the sun god. Roman chamomile is used in aromatherapy for its skin benefiting properties such as anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic and analgesic. It also adds a calming aspect to a blend, which may help in times of tension.

Safety Data - Non-toxic and non-irritant. Occasionally, contact dermatitis has occurred with this oil and those who are allergic to the Ragweed family should probably not use it.

Parliament Building, Budapest, Hungary
Parliament Building, Budapest, Hungary

Photographic Print
, Panoramic...
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Moroccan Chamomile



Botanical Name - Ormenis mixta, Chamaemelum mixtum, or Ormenis multicaulis

Common Method Of Extraction - Steam distilled

Parts Used – Flowers

Note Classification - Middle

Aroma -Fresh, herbaceous, balsamic undertone

Largest Producing Countries - Morocco

Traditional Use - Moroccan chamomile oil has a short history. It is mostly used in perfumery.

Properties - Antispasmodic, emmenagogue, sedative.

Benefits - Amenorrhea, dysmenorrhea, headache, insomnia, irritability, migraine, sensitive skin. This oil may add a rich herbaceous note to a blend.

Blends Well With - Cedarwood, cypress, frankincense, labdanum, lavandin, lavender, oakmoss, vetiver.

Of Interest - Moroccan chamomile is not considered a true chamomile. It should not be used as a replacement for roman or german oils in a blend, because it is chemically and aromatically different. It is distantly related to the German and Roman chamomile botanically, although it does not resemble them physically. It is also seldom traded in the market as "False Chamomile" or Ormenis oil.

Safety Data - Generally non-toxic and non-irritant – more specific safety data is unavailable at present.





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