Macadamia Nut Oil









macadamia nut

Macadamia nut oil...Macadamia is the genus belonging to the family Proteaceae. There are nine species of Macadamia.

• integrifolia
• tetraphylla
• claudiensis
• grandis
• hildebrandii
• jansenii
• ternifolia
• neurophylla
• whelanii

The only edible species are integrifolia and tetrapylla. The other species are poisonous and/or inedible. The species ternifolia and whelanii contain cyanogenic glycosides and are therefore toxic.

The aborigines of eastern Australia ate this native nut that grew in the rainforests, thousands of years before European settlers arrived there. The M. integrifolia nut was called gyndl or jindilli. In New South Wales the M. tetraphylla is traditionally known as boombera.

In 1828, Allan Cunningham was the first European to discover this plant. The German-Australian botanist Ferdinand von Mueller gave the genus the scientific name Macadamia in 1857. He named it after his friend Dr. John MacAdam, a noted scientist and secretary to the Philosophical Institute of Australia.

The tree is an evergreen tree growing 6 1/2 to 39 ft (2-12 m) tall and producing white to pink or purple flowers. The nut’s shell is very hard. Cracking it requires a blunt instrument such as a hammer or rock. The nuts are often fed to Hyacinth Macaws in captivity. These large birds are one of the few animals, besides humans, able to crack and shell the nut.

hyacinth macaw
This nut was originally found in the rain forests of Australian. It prefers fertile, well-drained soils. The trees were first commercially grown in New South Wales in the early 1880’s by Charles Staff. The seeds were imported into Hawaii in 1881 by William H. Purvis as a windbreak for sugar cane. The oil is commercially produced in Hawaii and Australia. The Hawaiian produced macadamia established the nut internationally.


It’s used in cosmetics, especially skincare because of its high oxidative stability and high content of Omega-7(palmitoleic acid). The human sebum of the young contains Omega-7. As the skin matures the level of Omega-7 dramatically drops off. Therefore, mature skin benefits from Macadamia nut oil. It penetrates into the skin very quickly.




Why is Macadamia Nut Oil So Good?




macadamia integrifolia flower

This nut is very nutritious containing the highest amount of monounsaturated fatty acids of any known nut. The percentage of monounsaturated fatty acids in this oil is 80% as compared to olive oil’s 74%. This oil also has a better, Omega-6 fatty acids to Omega-3 fatty acids, ratio then olive oil. The fatty acid profile of this oil contains palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and phytosterols.

This oil contains about 22% palmitoleic acid (Omega-7). It also contains the vitamins and minerals: calcium, potassium, phosphorus, iron, vitamin B1 (thiamine), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), niacin, and selenium.

Macadamia nut oil makes perfect cooking oil. It has a very high smoke point (400-450 degrees F). This allows for excellent cooking versatility and it is becoming famous among chefs, rather than olive oil. In addition, the formation of trans-fatty acids doesn’t occur, because of its high smoke point. If an oil has a low smoke point and is heated to a high temperature, it’s susceptible to degradation of the beneficial fatty acids forming toxic compounds. It can also be used for baking.

Macadamia nut oil is popular because of its great health benefits. It benefits the nervous system, cardiovascular system, and helps regulate and control diabetes. It contains 120 calories per tablespoonful (15ml) so eating too much will cause an accumulation of body fat. In 2003, human nutrition research in Australia showed that this nut lowers total and LDL cholesterol levels.

Macadamia nut oil is also used for wound healing, aid against sunburn, and maintaining the skin’s water barrier functions.

When shopping for this oil, look for the expeller-pressed or cold pressed oil to retain the natural occurring vitamins and enzymes. It has a nutty flavor and compliments chicken, fish, vegetables, stir fry and salad dressings. I even use it for my fried eggs and it tastes really good.

Store in a cool, dry, and dark place. It has an unrefrigerated shelf life of one to two years.

Macadamia nuts are toxic to dogs. Toxicosis may result upon ingestion causing weakness with the inability to stand within 12 hours of this ingestion. Recovery is seen within 48 hours.

Juicer Recipes For Energy Juices will boost your body's natural immunity system, your energy levels and vitality. Add juicing to your diet along with oils like macadamia nut and coconut!





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The information on Healthy-Healing-Oils.com is not offered for the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of any disease or disorder nor have any statements herein been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). We strongly encourage you to discuss topics of concern with your health care provider.

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